Technology

CEREC Technology - Crowns in 1 visit

Say goodbye to everything you thought you knew about dental restorations, and say hello to CEREC. CEREC is the most preferred CAD/CAM technology used by dentists worldwide. In just one office visit you can have your teeth fully restored and looking like new. CEREC treatments do not use amalgam, gold, or any other metal products; instead CEREC uses a ceramic, tooth colored material that helps restore your teeth back to their natural look and composition.

We are your local CEREC dentist for single-visit tooth restorations. Why go to the dentist a second time if you don’t have to?

What is CEREC?

CEREC is a technology for restoring damaged teeth, and this restoration can be completed in a single visit to the doctor’s office. It makes your teeth stronger and more beautiful, all while keeping your teeth looking natural. The restoration is metal-free, and the high-grade ceramic material is compatible with the natural tissue found in your mouth.

The CEREC Process

During your appointment, you and your doctor will discuss the details of the procedure and your doctor will answer any questions you may have. Your doctor will then apply a thin layer of reflective powder onto your tooth and will use a special 3D imaging camera to take a photo of your tooth. Using CEREC’s proprietary software, your restoration will be designed according to your tooth’s appropriate form and function. Then, CEREC will use diamond burs to create your restoration out of a piece of ceramic. Finally, the ceramic restoration is bonded to your tooth using state-of-the-art adhesive dentistry.

Why Choose CEREC?

There are many advantages of using CEREC over traditional crown technology.

  • Time: CEREC crowns are made in one visit, saving you considerable time away from your job and family.
  • Comfort: With CEREC, there is no need for a temporary crown, eliminating significant potential discomfort.
  • Aesthetics: The strong, tooth-colored ceramic materials of CEREC restore your teeth to their natural strength, beauty, and function, and closely match the composition of your natural tooth structure.
  • Strength: Milled ceramic is stronger than the traditional method of layering and pressing, so your smile will stay beautiful for years!
  • Fillings: CEREC material and technology can also be used for fillings. Since these fillings are made out of porcelain, they are more durable than white composite fillings.
Digital Radiographs - X-Rays

Digital radiographs, also known as X-rays, are a necessary part of good patient care. Dental X-rays help dentists visualize diseases of the teeth and surrounding tissue that cannot be seen with a simple oral exam. In addition, X-rays help the dentist find and treat dental problems early in their development, which can potentially save you money, unnecessary discomfort, and maybe even your life. It is our duty to provide competent care, and radiographs are vital to proper diagnoses.

What Problems Can Dental X-Rays Detect?

In adults, dental X-rays can be used to:

  • Show areas of decay that may not be visible with an oral exam, especially small areas of decay between teeth
  • Identify decay occurring beneath an existing filling or crown
  • Reveal bone loss that accompanies gum disease
  • Reveal changes in the bone or in the root canal resulting from infection
  • Assist in the preparation of tooth implants, braces, dentures, or other dental procedures
  • Reveal an abscess (an infection at the root of a tooth or between the gum and a tooth)

In children, dental X-rays are used to:

  • Watch for decay
  • Determine if there is enough space in the mouth to fit all incoming teeth
  • Determine if primary teeth are being lost quickly enough to allow permanent teeth to come in properly
  • Check for the development of wisdom teeth and identify if the teeth are impacted (unable to emerge through the gums)

How Often Should Teeth be X-Rayed:

The frequency of getting X-rays of your teeth often depends on your medical and dental history and current condition. Some people may need X-rays as often as every six months; others with no recent dental or gum disease and who visit their dentist regularly may get X-rays only every couple of years. If you are a new patient, your dentist may take X-rays as part of the initial exam and to establish a baseline record from which to compare changes that may occur over time.

People who fall into the high risk category who many need X-rays taken more frequently include:

  • Children generally need more X-rays than adults because their teeth and jaws are still developing and because their teeth are smaller. As a result, decay can reach the inner part of the tooth, dentin, quicker and spread faster.
  • Adults with extensive restorative work, such as fillings and crowns to look for decay beneath existing fillings and crowns or in new locations.
  • People who drink a lot of sugary beverages to look for tooth decay (since the sugary environment creates a perfect situation for cavities to develop).
  • People with periodontal (gum) disease to monitor bone loss.
  • People who have dry mouth – called xerostomia – whether due to medications (such as antidepressants, anti-anxiety drugs, antihistamines, and others) or disease states (such as Sjögren’s syndrome, damaged salivary glands, radiation treatment to head and neck). Dry mouth conditions can lead to the development of cavities.
  • Smokers to monitor bone loss resulting from periodontal disease (smokers are at increased risk of periodontal disease).

How Safe Are Dental X-Rays?

Exposure to all sources of radiation – including the sun, minerals in the soil, appliances in your home, and dental X-rays – can damage the body’s tissues and cells and can lead to the development of cancer in some instances. Fortunatly, the dose of radiation you are exposed to during the taking of dental X-rays is extremely small, especially if your dentist is using digital X-rays.

Advances in dentistry over the years have led to a number of measures that will minimize the risks associated with X-rays. However, even with the advancements in safety, the effects of radiation are added together over a lifetime. So every little bit of radiation you receive from all sources counts.

If you are concerned about radiation exposure due to X-rays, talk to your dentist about how often X-rays are needed ad why they are being taken. While some people need X-rays taken more frequently, current guidelines require that X-rays be given only when needed for clinical diagnoses.

Intra-Oral Photography

Intraoral cameras are a small, pen-shaped device that the team may use to get a closer look at your oral health. These cameras capture digital images of your teeth and gums. We can also use the images to help patients understand why we recommend certain treatments. Treatment approvals from insurance companies are improved with hard visual evidence also.

Using intraoral photography, we can detect a variety of oral health issues and nonissues, including the following:

  • Tooth decay and cavities
  • Spots of gingivitis
  • Tooth fractures
  • Tooth and gum abnormalities
  • Healthy areas of the mouth
  • Monitor lesions for changes